Benefits of the different post-16 options

There are lots of pathways and options open to you. Find out more about the benefits of each here.

The information below is designed to give you an idea of the benefits of the different options available to you at post-16. 

Use this information to gain a better understanding of each of the different options available so that you can make the best decision for you and your future goals. 

Benefits of studying an A-Level 

A levels | National Careers Service

A level is a subject-based qualifications usually assessed by exams. They can lead to further study, training, or work.

The benefits of studying an A level include:

  • You can study more widely over a variety of subjects if you are unsure of a specific career aim.
  • Certain A levels may be mandatory of degree course such as medicine.
  • Learning, in the main on a college campus you will have opportunities to make lots of new friends as well as learning alongside existing friends.
  • One of the most popular and effective routes with the option to choose 3-5 different A levels of your favourite / best subjects.
  • A range of locations to choose between.
  • Choice of either 1 or 2 years of learning dependent on if you wish to take your studies further.

Find out more about the benefits of studying A-Levels.

Benefits of studying a BTEC

What is a BTEC diploma? - Nationals, Firsts & Apprenticeships (ucas.com)

BTEC stands for the Business and Technology Education Council. BTECs are specialist work-related qualifications.

The benefits of studying a BTEC include:

  • BTEC students have a high success rate of going into employment after their studies. 
  • BTECs will either let you go into professional work or go to a top university
  • Preferable for those who like to combine vocational (hands-on) learning, whilst developing their skills and knowledge.
  • As you study one broad subject area, BTECs can provide a direct route into your chosen career.
  • Gain UCAS points if you want to go to university.
  • BTECs use different assessments to A levels, including projects, assessments and modular work rather than one final exam.

Find out more about the benefits of studying BTECs.

Benefits of studying a T-Level

T Levels | National Careers Service

A T Level is a nationally recognised qualification for 16 to 19-year-olds that takes 2 years to complete.

Leading businesses and employers helped design T Levels to give you the knowledge and skills you need.

They're roughly equal to 3 A levels.

The benefits of studying a T-level include:

  • Counts as 3 A Levels and aligned to specific sectors.
  • More suited to those who have a chosen career path.
  • Teaches you multiple skills.
  • Lasts for 2 years of education.
  • 80% course based learning  and  20% Industry placement.
  • Get to test skills and knowledge within industry.

Find out more about the benefits of studying T-Levels.

What is an Apprenticeship?

Apprenticeships | National Careers Service

Apprenticeships are real jobs that allow you to earn a wage while you learn. They can take between 1 and 5 years to complete, depending on the level.

The benefits of studying an apprenticeship include:

  • Paid whilst learning.
  • Foot in the door to future employment.
  • A taste for what the career holds whilst gaining education and learning.
  • A more personalised learning experience in a work environment.

Find out more about the benefits of apprenticeships.

How will going to university affect my pay?

Going to university is a big decision and one that has an impact on many parts of your future life. One of the ways that it can directly impact your life is on your average salary. 

The graph below shows how different levels of qualification affect average salary.

Image
Graph showing the average salary of those with varying levels of qualification. The dark blue line represents university graduates, the light blue line represents those with an apprenticeship, the black line represents those with A level qualification and the green line represents those with GCSE qualifications.

The dark blue line represents those with a degree qualification, the light blue line represents those who have completed and apprenticeship, the black line represents those with A-level qualifications and the green line represents those with GCSE qualifications.